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    Visit MSF projects around the world and see what we really do. This month, we look to the deplorable conditions of Malian refugees in Mbera camp, Mauritania. We look at the humanitarian situation in Somalia and that of sub-Saharan migrants trapped in Morocco.We also look at drug patents in India, life in Papua New Guinea and a failing health system in Chechnya.  
 Safeguarding access to affordable medicines & preventing abusive patenting of medicines is vitalThe landmark decision on Monday by the Indian Supreme Court in Delhi to uphold India's Patents Act in the face of the seven-year challenge by Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis, is a major victory for access to affordable medicines in developing countries, and sets a strong example for...
 Decision safeguards access to affordable medicines and prevents abusive patenting of medicines  New Delhi/Geneva – The landmark decision by the Indian Supreme Court in Delhi to uphold India's Patents Act in the face of the seven-year challenge by Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis is a major victory for patients' access to affordable medicines in developing countries, the...
 BackgroundMédecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) continues to follow progress of the case currently unfolding in India’s Supreme Court. The question of what deserves a patent, enshrined in Section 3(d) of the country’s patent law, is at the crux of Swiss company Novartis’ six year legal battle against the Indian government, which has now reached the Supreme Court.Section 3(d...
 Congo – Yaws in the forestNiger – Malaria & Malnutrition, the double sentenceSri Lanka – End of missionNovartis – Court case in India begins
Case could negatively impact India’s role as ‘pharmacy of the developing world’New Delhi/Geneva  – Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis heads to the Indian Supreme Court today in New Delhi, in a final bid to undermine a key public health safeguard in Indian patent law specifically designed to prevent drug companies from abusive patenting practices which keep medicine prices high. If...
A Novartis win could severely restrict production of affordable medicines in India   BASEL – As shareholders of Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis meet today in Basel, Switzerland, the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) called on shareholders to urge the company to drop its ongoing court case against the Indian government...
 Cape Town – Health activists, academics, medical doctors, government representatives, and lawyers today held a rally protesting the drug company Novartis’ court case against the Indian government, warning that the case could have a devastating impact on access to affordable medicines. The rally was part of a closing march of the 3rd People’s Health Assembly, which took place from July 7-...
For the past 6 years drug giant Novartis has been pursuing a legal case in India that threatens access to life-saving affordable medicines for millions across the developing world. Since launching our Twitter-based campaign in 2012, well over 20,000 messages have been sent telling Novartis to drop its case. On Monday, 1 April, the Indian Supreme Court will issue its verdict on the court case....
What Novartis says: “price doesn’t affect access to medicines”. In a statement issued in 2010, Novartis writes that “acknowledging innovation by granting a patent is unrelated to the access to medicines issue. Improving access to medicines is a matter of making medicines available.” This is not the entire truth. MSF’s field experience in...
1994 – India signs the World Trade Organization (WTO)‘s Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement) which means that it must now start granting patents on medicines no later than 2005. 2003 - Novartis launches its imatinib mesylate as a blood cancer medicine (brand name: Gleevec) in the US at $2,600 per patient per month. Generic...
In 2006 the drug company Novartis took the Indian government to court over its patent law, in a move that threatened access to affordable medicines produced in India for millions of people across the developing world. The company wanted to get the law changed so that they could more easily extend the patents on their products, and stop generic companies producing the same medicines at a...
Q: Why do millions of people rely on India for affordable medicines? A: Drugs produced by companies in India are among the cheapest in the world. That is because until 2005, India did not grant patents on medicines. India is one of the few developing countries with production capacity to manufacture quality-assured generic medicines. By producing cheaper generic versions of drugs that were...
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